A 2023 Land Rover Range Rover.

This is not the Range Rover I will be Driving, but it’s close enough.
Photo: Andy Kalmowitz / Jalopnik

Land Rover has been kind enough to lend me one of my favorite vehicles – the fifth-generation L460 Range Rover – to do as I please for a weekend with my folks in New Jersey. But, before I hit the road in this gold behemoth, I want to know what you want to know about it.

A little over a year ago, I drove the all-new Range Rover at its launch in Napa Valley, but now I get to revisit it with a lot more automotive experience under my belt and a lot more time on my hands to give it a thorough going over.

There are a few boilerplate things we can get out of the way. This particular Range Rover I’m driving is a seven-seat SE model with the excellent BMW-sourced 4.4-liter twin-turbocharged V8. The powerplant is mated up to a ZF 8-speed automatic transmission that sends power to all four wheels. It pushes out a very strong 523 horsepower and 553 lb-ft of torque. That’s more than enough to power this behemoth down the road.

The truck I’m driving has a base price of $135,000 but with options and destination, MSRP is a tick north of $153,000. That’s a lot of money, but after all, this is a lot of car. Some of the big ticket options we’ve got here are 23-inch(!) wheels (21’s are standard), the technology pack, a fancy tailgate seating arrangement and a $2,000 “Bantumi Gold” paint job.

Land Rover made a big deal of the fact this is the first full-fat Range Rover to get a third row of seating, so I’m going to be shoving folks back there to see if you can really get the Range Rover experience when you’re sitting in the trunk. My gut tells me yes, but they’re going to have to be a small-ish person. I mean, there’s literally third-row heated seating. I’ve never heard of that before and someone needs to experience it!

So, why don’t you drop down below and let me know what you want to know about the 2023 Land Rover Range Rover?



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