GM working on fix for Holden Commodore parts shortage


Holden Commodore owners are facing lengthy delays for certain spare parts, but General Motors says it’s working on a solution.

Since Holden ended local production in October 2017, owners of its Australian-built Commodore have relied on either a backlog of spare parts made prior to manufacturing shutting up shop or contracted suppliers to provide new plastic components, such as new bumpers.

However, Adelaide-based Trident Plastics – which made the new bumpers for General Motors, and specialised in garbage bins – fell into administration in June 2023, with InDaily reporting in July the injection moulding firm owed its creditors more than $52 million.

This has resulted in huge backlogs for parts, not only affecting those who want to restore their beloved cars but also repairers who have been tasked with returning damaged Commodores to the road.

It’s not yet known how many generations of Commodore this affects, though owners who’ve voiced their concerns on social media have said models from the last Australian-made VFs all the way back to the VN of the late 1980s are facing long delays.

Some disgruntled owners have claimed they’ve already had to wait upwards of a year for a new bumper, with some insurance repairers refusing to use secondhand parts from other cars.

If they do choose to source parts from used vehicles rather than directly from the manufacturer, they’re now being met with significantly higher prices – leading to insurers paying out owners rather than forcing them to wait on an expensive and long-running repair job.

“It’s cheaper for the insurance company to pay them out these days, because it’s hard to get the parts and they’re so expensive, they just write off the car,” Ziad Miestro, owner of Westgate Commodore Wreckers told 7News.

Though there are third-party and aftermarket companies which sell new, unpainted bumpers and other plastic parts for Australian Holden models, owners run the risk of a different fitment compared to factory-backed supply, while repairers are typically required by insurers to use genuine items.

A spokesperson for General Motors – which still operates in Australia, despite Holden being shut down in 2020 – told CarExpert it’s currently working on a way to resolve the supply constraints, claiming new parts could be available before the end of August.

“We have occasional disruptions in the parts supply chain due to unforeseen challenges but always work to rectify these as quickly as possible,” a General Motors spokesperson said. 

“There have been challenges in the supply of Commodore facias due to the supplier going into administration, but GM Australia and New Zealand has continued to work with the supplier and administrators to find solutions so production can recommence, and we currently estimate that supply will gradually begin to resume at the start of Q3 2024.

“Customers can reach out to our Customer Care team anytime to escalate an issue. Our Customer Care team can be reached by submitting an online enquiry at Holden.com.au or call us at 1800 GM Holden.”

More than 2.3 million Holden Commodores were built in Australia for the local market between late 1978 and October 2017, not including examples which were exported to markets like the US and Middle East.

General Motors not only still operates in Australia through GM Specialty Vehicles (GMSV) – the local distributor of Chevrolet and soon GMC – but also Cadillac, which is due to launch later this year.

It also owns and operates ACDelco, its replacement parts and service division which took over branding of some former Holden dealers following the closure of the carmaker.





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